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: the chicago board of education is expected to vote on the measure in may. declining enrollment has also forced other major cities like washington d.c. and philadelphia to close scores of public schools in recent years. we take up the debate now with two people at the center of the fight. we start with jesse ruiz. he's vice president of the chicago board of education. he was appointed to that post by mayor rahm emanuel in 2011. i spoke with him a short time ago. welcome to you, so why is such a dramatic action so necessary? is this resources, money, pure and simple? >> no. it is two-fold. one, we are looking at a record budget deficit of about $1 billion next year. so we're looking for every aspect to reap savings in our system. and we have underutilized schools as a result from it population loss in certain parts of the city of chicago. it's healthy for those schools to right size, to become fully utilizeed schools and combining under-utilizeed schools which garners savings we can reinvest and focus the resources we have in one school billion as opposed to multiple, partially used billions. >>
. and that brings us to education nation. which is part of an ongoing commitment by nbc news, to foster a national dialogue about the future of education in america. today education nation is on the road in detroit with he had nbc's education correspondent, rehema ellis. >> we want to talk about what's happening to the schools in michigan. but in detroit, we can't help but talk about what's happening in the city of detroit. joining me right now is the governor of michigan, rick snyder. and the news of the day is that on monday, your emergency financial manager for detroit is going to go to work. there's a lot of controversy around it. people are protesting, saying it's unconstitutional. that he's going to sell off some iconic pieces of the city in order to balance the budget. what do you say? >> well it is legal. this is a crisis. and we need to turn it around. and if you look at, we've had success with emergency managers. if you look at detroit public schools, they've had one for the last several years and we're seeing the kids learn better now. flint and pontiac have emergency managers, working
strong. like education, the ability of students to attend college, medical research and inthe noah vation, the about of -- ability of our older neighbors to live their lives in dignity in their retirement years through medicare and long-term care. now we get a lot of advice and economists across the board, in fact, our own congressional budget office, advise that the best and fastest way to reduce the deficit to is to make sure people across america have jobs and are working. it is inexplicable that the republican budget proposes to eliminate jobs in construction, in education, scientific research, and instead heaps the burden on middle class families. experts predict the republican budget will reresult in job losses of two million fewer jobs next year alone. that's on top of 750,000 jobs lost by the end of the year due to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close t
the department of education think it as good idea clothe one of the top three mass killers of the 20th century on the kid sec nun of their website. some say it is because they are stupid and other os say it is because they are dumben. a shocking story of something nun necessary for any one who lives in new york city. >> does one congressman think federal workers who haven't paid their taxes should be lined up and shot? stay tuned to find out. >> you are more like the fun free zone. >> i don't get it. >> it is a play on gun free. >> not the following? >> you know what? i'm not following you. go away. [ laughter ] >> let's welcome my goodness it's wonderful. wow. here with fox news anchor patti ann browne. the donna reid of 2013 and if commentary were math homework i would do him in the morning. bernie. my repulsive sidekick. >> bill: bill schulz. he brushes with a head hodge and garringles with mr. pibb. army special forces member kerry. should children learn a hook from the little redbook? on friday a day of the week barry the department of education website quoted the murderous former head o
deficit. for students in detroit problems with the education system are being magnified by that community's economic troubles. if you look statewide a quarter of michigan children under 17 were living in poverty in 2011. compare that to detroit where the number is more than twice that much. it is 57%, folks. nearly two in three detroit children 5 and under are below the poverty line. msnbc's correspondent joins us live from detroit where she'll cohost a summit on education today and a student town hall tomorrow. those numbers are frightening and daunting. >> they really are startling numbers. i've got my notebook with me because i'm going to school today, chris. it has a lot of people worried and concerned and working to change the dynamics of those numbers. that's what we'll be talking about here. many people are also concerned about the fact, the elephant in the room we can't dismiss that come monday the city of detroit will be under the auspices of an emergency financial manager. people should also know for the past four years detroit schools have been under emergency management and in
voices to help educate people. we have so many screaming people on both sides of the equation, and we're not making enough progress. >> dr. carson, i watched you, and we've been on the show before, for which i am grateful, and i've watched you on other shows and have been reading about you. it looks like you are a problem solver and looking for common ground. i get that. that's probably something lacking in this country. i just had a thought on the economy. if you take a look at unemployment rates, overall, 7.7% is not the worst thing in the world, but four years after the recovery, it should be lower. here's the ones that are killers, and i just want to get your thoughts on how to solve it. teenage employment in the usa, total teenage employment, 25%. overall black employment, 13.8%. and the worst one is teenage black employment, 43%. how in the world can we solve those problems, sir? >> it's going to take a concerted effort. first of all, we as a society need to recognize for every one of those young people we can keep from going on the path of despair, that's one more tax paying pr
an index fund. they have to educate for themselves. >> that's an interesting point. most people would think the opposite. putting my money in a bank is not risky. an index fund is risky. comes down to people's fear. worried about the market. the market is volatile and it's risky. what do you do when people tell you that? >> it's the thing about fear and ignorance allowing us to dictate financial decisions. we should never allow that. we should never be scared of something you don't know about. a lot of individuals are scared of something because they have not put pun in the market. what other alternatives do you have? show me another that can give you a 13.2% return. you show me another that can give that type of return or security. what we have to do, this is what lewis has been doing for years, directly addressing and making sure you know there are other alternatives such as exchange traded funds. for $150 a share you can buy the entire s&p 500. >> all you need is a trading account to get in. this gives you exposure. >> again, you don't trust because it's high risk. there's ways to mitiga
. some join right out of high school with the promise that they can further their education while in the military. this helps not only our troops but an educated military helps america. now the administration has broken another promise. thousands of troops can no longer go to college because the education program has been scuttled. for the sake of politics, the chicken little administration has handpicked programs to cut that would make americans feel the sequester the most. one of those programs is the military tuition assistance program. mr. speaker, tuition assistance for our military is not much money. the pentagon, the department of defense, has a budget of $700 billion. this little program is .1% of e $700 billion department of defense program. the tuition assistance program is great because it's one of the ways our government can take care of our men and women who help us. it's allowed members of the military to take 870,000 courses and graduate 50,000 individuals from many degrees. that is remarkable. but the program is gone thus sayeth the white house. the over the past f
that the economic philosophy of republicans has caused a massive amount of wealth for everyone. and education is ripe if reform and republican principles are perfect for minority voters. >> should i let you weigh in? >> i'm sorry. >> why are you laughing? >> you're laughing at education. expound upon your laughter on education. >> well, because its s's ridicus to try to think that the party who tried to get rid of the department of education is the one who wants to push education. it's ridiculous to think the tent that wanted to gut the teachers union want to push education. the party that wanted to take funding away from education is now the party in favor of education. that's reason i started laughing. >> those policieses worked well for you over the last 40 years. those schools that you're professing that teachers unions have a hold on on are doing really well. where school choice and charter schools that's what's doing well and voters across minority voters to voters of every ethnicity tick have seen the benefits of those kind of schools. >> by this argument, we can see how difficult the
campaigning for girls rights to an education. taliban extremists shot her in the head. since then, she has been receiving treatment in birmingham. >> at 15, she has already seized responsibility, taking her fight for education to the world stage. there's even talk of a nobel peace prize. concerns today, her are those of every other british teenager. it is all about making friends. she is doing her best. >> she herself wants to be a normal teenage girl and to have the support of other girls around her. i think that is something she has very much missed during her time in hospital. >> she will enter in your 9 -- year 9. >> today, tens of thousands of people filled st. peter's square for the first public mass of pope francis. the newly installed pontiff said out his priorities and thrilled the crowd, riding around in an open vehicle. our correspondent has the story. >> he wants his pontificate to be marked by humility, to be a pope close to the people, so gone are the bullet through screens that would separate him from the masses. he mary's the authority of the papacy with the informal sponta
education to national parks to meals on wheels. $1.2 trillion in cuts over ten years. >> stephen: yeah, but it won't be that bad because there's no way america is going to last ten years. we have two tops. [laughter] obama is trying to scare us into responsible behavior. >> thousands of teachers and educators will be laid off. air traffic controllers and airport security will see cutbacks which means more delays at airports across the country. emergency responders, their ability to help communities respond to and recover from disasters will be degraded. federal prosecutors have to close cases and let criminals go. >> stephen: don't believe him nation, obama is trying to convince us the sequester is a terrible problem when in fact it's a terrible solution. it was born back in 2011 when obama wanted to raise the debt ceiling. the amount that america can borrow to pay its bills. it's sort of like raising the credit limit on your visa to pay off your mastercard if you had used your mastercard to pay for two trillion-dollar wars. but -- listen, wait. [cheers and applause] they were worth it
to the senate floor. gregg? >> growing concerns over higher education in the united states as new numbers suggest the level of student loan debt is reaching crisis proportions. according to the federal reserve bank of new york, americans now hold a total of nearly a trillion dollars in student loan debt, as an average of $23,000 per person and that could take an advantage person roughly tn years to pay off, maybe more. joining us now the reverend jesse jackson, founder and president of the rainbow push coalition. i know you're deeply concerned about this, in part because i read your recent column on the problem. how do we solve it. >> well, it's more about a trillion dollars, more than credit card debt, so many youth who have able minds will not apply and those in school cannot stay in. and in black colleges about 15,000 fewer this year and some, the money without necessarily the grade. and some grades can't because of the money and that undermines our future capacity to compete. >> gregg: part of the problem is that the price of a four-year college education has really skyrocketed. i loo
of education creating and filling a new job and pays six figures. and washington correspondent byron york joins us and the reason is, this is probably after the sequestration. >> it is, it's the white house initiative on educational excellence for african-americans, it was created by executive order. >> greta: the president did it. >> he created it himself, by the president last year. it was placed in the education department, pay is about $124,000 a year and it's just been filled. >> greta: after march 1st? >> after march 1st and sequestration takes effect. what you have when you have the czars or coordinators or whatever you want to call them, it's an admission that the federal government has a lot of programs that are spending a lot of money that aren't well-coordinated and aren't working together well and the president feels he needs to appoint somebody to do that. right there it's kind of an admission the whole system is a little bloated. >> greta: after everything else is cut march 1st and when he created by executive order we knew sequestration was likely to happen within six or seven mo
, or the end of men. more women than men get a college education, women are for the first time in the majority in the workplace, in managerial positions. so it's very hard for us to look back to that other time. and i was, you know, even though abstractly understand that things were different, we don't know, um, we we can't really see and feel it exactly. i interviewed janet malcolm for the paris review, and she told me that when she was in college, she had not a single woman professor. and i was just shocked. even though i know that life was like that, it was kind of astonishing to me. so my first question i was going to ask our two panelists who were alive for the feminine mystique to just describe for a moment one, um, your experience when you first read the book, and it is overblown or exaggerated to say that this book changed people's lives? >> oh, i don't think there's any question. i mean, of course, it changed people's lives. it's till changing people's lives. it is passed down true the culture. and it was the greatest social revolution probably since the suffragists. and that movement
so frequently face discrimination in everyday life. in all aspects of their life. from education, employment and health care, to all of their social relationships. as a result it's harder for them to stay healthy, to get health care insurance coverage, and to get the health care they need. here at cap we are leveraging implementation of the affordable care act help eliminate barriers that keep the and transgender people in the with hiv from achieving the highest animal health care needs, health care that they need. in particular, our lgbt stated change project is working in states across the country to support better data collection, better consumer protection, comprehensive and reliable insurance benefits, and a successful implementation of the medicaid expansion. when you look at the affordable care act, you know, those on the right complained that it is a bit of social engineering. and what it really is is trying to ensure that we cover all americans and provide them with good coverage. we should also look at the aca as an opportunity to expand basic rights for the lesbian, ga
spending to balance the budget by 2023. >> the california department of education is expanding it's list of recommended reading for kindergarten through 12th grade. that includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here is nannette miranda in sacramento. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. california department of education up updated the list of books that is to prepare students for college, klutd for the first time are winners of the stone wall book award that recognizes gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we can all be accepted who we are. i think it's great to see those books recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age from young kids activity books celebrating gay rights leader harvey milk to books like older kids like transgender teens and totally joe a boy coming out. >> there is a full sexual war. >> social conservatives are appalled. they say such topics have no place on the state's official reading list. >> they are not being taught critical think
the seventh fittest economy in the world. we're ranked 34th in primary education and health care. our macro economic environment is 111th. that cannot be right. our next guest says the notion that we're losing our competitive edge is widespread and pervasive, it is not necessarily correct. ed mcbride is the washington bureau chief for the author of the special ro on america competitiveness. welcome, sir. >> thank you for having me. >> would you like to tell me, and i welcome the message that things are not as bleak as we've been told. please. talk us off the ledge. >> well, as you said, there is a the love hand wringing, a lot of reports. these dire statistic that's seem so dreadful. it is almost impossible to remember they're true. 111th? that's to do with the size of the national debt basically. but what all these gloomy sort of hand wringing accounts neglect, they focus on washington and on gridlock and on the failure to resolve all the questions about the budget and they don't look at what's going on in the rest of the country. the good news is, that in the rest country, people aren't s
the budget by 2023. >>> the california department of education is expanding its list of recommended reading for kindergarten through twelve grade and it includes newly published works dealing with sexual identity issues. here's abc7 news capital correspondent nannette miranda in sacramento with the story. >>> as summer nears, educators want to keep kids reading. the california department of education just updated its list of more than 7,800 recommended books. meant to prepare students for college and the ever-changing world. included for the first time are winners of the stonewall book award which recognizes lesbian, gay, bi-sexual and transgender literature. >> it's good to teach kids that everyone is different and we are all people and we can all be accepted for who we are. i think it's great to see those books being recommended. >> the books are recommended according to age. from young kids activity books celebrating gay rights leader harvey mills to books for older kids like "i am jay," a novel about transgender teens. and "totally joe," telling about a boy coming out. >> there's a full
the crac, has not been educate along the way. i think an organization like the national endowment for financial education is a great resource to start from. i don't believe that wall street is always the best place to get educated. so there's a start, a place to start a plan. melissa: yeah. >> next thing have someone hold you accountable. meet with somebody. i like pat's idea, find a financial buddy. we often work out with a buddy to help us out. find a financial advisor and somebody you can work with. melissa: that makes sense. you say saving 15 to 20% of your annual income. i wonder at what price? saving aside 20% of the your income, does that mean you don't buy a house, you rent instead? would you set aside the income and use credit cards and rack up debt so you can save? at what price, how seriouous is it to save that much money. >> how serious is that individual, that's the question. because let's put this in reference. this individual that in our scenario, sob who is 50 to 60 years old or so, they're really at the peak of their financial succs. they're making the most they e
99 weeks. these folks have been out of work two years, three, even four. they're college-educated professionals in their 40s or 50s, people who thought their company would take them all the way to retirement. vernon? >> i was very angry. i was very bitter. i was fed up with society, the corporate world, the lies, deceit, the greed. >> they don't look it, but they have fallen out of the middle class, turned in cars, gone on food stamps, taken kids out of college, and faced foreclosure. now, they've pinned their last hopes on joe carbone. >> the word "carnage" is a strong word, but i can't think of a better word in this case. and i-- what aggravates me is that there isn't outrage. we ought to be angry. we ought to be giving every moment of our time figuring out how we're gonna restore for them the american dream. >> joe carbone is president of something called the workplace. it's the state unemployment office in southwest connecticut where people get job training and placement help. carbone has a reputation for innovative job programs, but he has never seen so many people out of wor
-- lgbt community. the benefits and what is in play. outreach education and enrollment. you have to inform them of their choices and provide ways to help enroll new coverage where it is available. scaling of the workforce is how we can help with this. how will the care be monitored, and medicaid expansion decisions, health insurance exchanges and ultimately the future of ryan white. i will wrap up now and review of some of these thoughts with what the panel has to say. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, for that thoughtful overview. we are going to move now to our panel discussion. our moderator this morning is the advisor for lgbt policy and racial justice and director of the fire initiative that explores the impact of public policy on gay and transgender people of color. >> good morning, everyone. thank you for providing a great overview for us on how this benefits lgbt people and people living with hiv. includes the principles of universal design. some are marginalized among us and we are helping to work to get a system that works for everyone. we are we're going to talk about what we
to them. >> a lot to them if you're trying to piece together a college education, not large in terms of the big picture, but because of the sequester, the department of education said that these grants are cut and new grants are cut by 38% across the board. anytime a new grant if it was $5,000 before, it's about $2,000 less than that. >> greta: here is what i don't get. this is almost 40% cut. and 38% cut. explain if the sequester was 2.4% cut across the board, why are the young people taking it at 38%, this cut? how, i would think they would have 2.4%. two things going on the. one it's spread over a shorter period of time. we're halfway into the fiscal year so that 2.4% cut has to actually go into effect over a shorter period of time. >> greta: make it 4.8 or 4.8 then. >> the other thing, there are things in the sequester that are called off making sure the men and women in afghanistan and iraq themselves aren't in harm's way. and vast majority of military spending not cut. so when there are programs that are targeted they take the disproportionate chunk of the hit and that's the po
she's tried to influence the education policy and i enjoy talking with her and even more so the older sister who had gone to india to become involved with children who would not have had an education and all the issues related to that. i thought this was interesting and worst doing so i decided the best option was to offer myself to become a nun so at the age of 17 i spoke to the reverend mother to say i decided to become a nun. she said think about it. go away for a year then be will receive you. my parents were very happy with my choice because i honored to be a nun and they're happy to have me another year. they decided nothing was too good for their daughter said they thought they would send me to paris for one year. [laughter] that changed everything. [laughter] i describe that in detail in the book. [laughter] and they came under a different influence. i had a grandfather retired earlier and what he practiced with the pork guy against the landlord and he was pleased to have a young girl who was interested in what he was talking about. he did not know how to speak to a child and
health professionals to parents and educators, in an effort named at preventing more tragedies like this. >> jon: the president there reacting to the tragedy at sandy hook elementary school. one key item in his plan, the ban on assault weapons. that ended this week after harry reid dropped the ban from any legislation. so, jim, you didn't get a lot of coverage on that in the media. >> well, on cnn on thursday, you got a certain amount of oh, hand wringing, it's so terrible. the end of everything in terms of this issue. and you're struck by the contrast that news thursday was covered and the flip for the president in last year. talks about mental health parents, educators and the pl panoply of things you might do. and so adam lanza the killer there, and sort of fallen out of the picture and the things have become gone control. the at media is so focused, john holmes, right about a the lot of things, converted to islam, and in terms of what was going on with him. the only thing they want, define as justice for newtown is gun control up or down. >> jon: we'll get to you in a second, judy. r
in order to get this. we are educated people with means. and resources. it's that difficult for us. the system is broken. not only that, if the high-tech companies really want to fulfill the jobs they have, that they say, however there are, 80,000 that microsoft put out the other day, that in the industry they don't have enough engineers, they are not going to be able to get that bill passed through this congress. thinking pragmatic i. will they won't get it done without a comprehensive piece. what rand paul did today is maybe he disappointed a lot of people in love with him last week. but i think the good thing about him is he has true core beliefs. there is a lot worse that you could have in washington today. >> andrea: i do doubt that the republican party will be able to pull the voters in the party. but from right thing to do perspective, i feel like is it the right thing to do. maybe that's just because of my father's story and i see how hard he worked. i do see that there is dependency issues. i get that with every gender and ethnicity. i get that. everybody is susceptible to
billion in one year. we spend about $100 billion on education. we spend about $40 billion-plus, a little over, on highways, roads and bridges. that's just an example. we are now surging from 200, 250 in interest to 800 in interest as a result of the accounting that c.b.o. has provided us if we follow this path. it's going to crowd out spending for research. it's going to crowd out spending for children, education, health care and any other program this government wishes to undertake, including defense. mr. president, what kind of time limit might i inquire? is it 30 minutes on this side on this motion? the presiding officer: on the motion, there is one hour equally divided. would the senator like to call up his motion? mr. sessions: my first question would be how much time is left on my half of that hour? the presiding officer: the motion has not yet been called. mr. sessions: well, i would call up the motion, mr. president. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the motion. the clerk: the senator from alabama, mr. sessions, moves to recommit senate concurrent resolution 8 back to
to see better educated, but you understand that an effective member has to negotiate and has to compromise to come to some sort of final product. otherwise you will never get a final product. >> i agree with -- what is the biggest problem we face today that we are just stop gone? it is this fiscal crisis, the budget. families are looking at it and saying i have got to deal with this all the time, and you guys cannot deal with it. the biggest thing to me would be the leadership of congress to recognize that the budget aocess has to be utilized in way that gets this issue resolved, because if we go every three months with more in decision and 11th-hour -- making, thetizen frustration that people have to live their lives and cannot figure out the process, it will drive them nuts and treat the most negative phillies in the world. it is the responsibility of leadership to make this process work, and they have to act like leaders, like tom daschle did and some of the other folks. >> changing the rules might take the incentive structure, but ultimately is about the men and women who
confident that an investment in their education will lead them to good-paying jobs when they graduate. a balanced budget gives them that confidence that their future will not be threatened by staggering debt. most important we must balance our budget for our children and grandchildren who deserve the same chance of the american dream that we have been given. rather than handing them a bill for this generation's irresponsibility, a balanced budget will allow us to hand them a brighter future, an american future. our budget, a balanced budget, represents a departure from the status quo here in washington and it represents house republicans' commitment to moving our nation forward in a fiscally responsible way. i urge my colleagues to support this resolution and i yield back my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from maryland, mr. sarbanes, for five minutes. mr. sarbanes: mr. speaker, i rise today to commemorate the 192nd anniversary of greek independence day. greece and america are history's most storied democracies. our founding
is simply put, will my schools perform to the ability that my kids can get a great education? that is one of the challenges we took on. it is interesting -- a couple years ago before i was governor this because young woman who wisconsin in a community called milwaukee. milwaukee schools are some of the most challenged in the country. this was a first year teach who was named outstanding teacher of the year. she got noticed about that a week later she got a second notice. do you know what that notice was? she got laid off. they cut funding in education so when you have less money in those situations, even though she was named one of the best teachers in the state in her profession. she was one of the first to be laid off. why? under the old system of collective bargains, the last hired is the first fired. we not only changed collective bargaining we changed it so no longer senior or tenure, in our state we hire and fire based on merit rit. [applause] we're the ones who want to go forward. that is about being relevant. sometimes we can see the arguments on the other side. we're the ones who
education, because i feel that if we educate ourselves, the more we educate ourselves, that we can overcome poverty. and the fact that if we do it as a community, and we stick together, we bond together, we support one another, with education, with health, then we can start to fix some of the issues at the root of the cause. and so we can erase, we can erase families who are struggling to get by on minimum wage. we can erase the drug abuse that we see on the streets and in the home. we can erase the gun violence and the domestic violence, and we can start to bring attention to mental illness. but this can only be done if everyone in the community is invested. so i think it has to be a position that we all take in which we say, yeah, take better care of yourself, yeah, go for your prescreening to make sure that you don't have any ailment that can be detrimental to you down the road. we also can then turn to our youth and our adults and say, "it's okay to get educated on these matters, it's okay to do well in school, for the young person that's in school. it's okay to achieve and be academica
're losing, our children are actually being indoctrinated in the education system. this teacher's union, they are teaching our kids the liberal philosophy, and if we could infiltrate the educational system and the media, we would probably have a better chance. host: and how do you use that? what changes need to be made in order to do that? are you not happy with current conservative outlets that are out there? caller: i would actually pay for the education from some of these conserve tizz so they could get into the school system. host: carl from martinsville, west virginia, with another call there at home this morning. here's a story from the "usa today", a few other stories we wanted to point out to you. relatives kept on campaign payrolls. an investigation that "usa today" did, 32 members of congress dispensed more than $2 million in campaign funds to pay relatives' salaries during the 2012 election cycle, a "usa today" analysis at the most recent campaign record shows. law makers have hired their children, their spouses, aunts, parents, and in-laws as consultants, account acts and re
in education reform. the've taken me around globe. i have seen firsthand the expose of economic growth in places like china, singapore, and brazil. in some of their cities on any given day, you can see dozens skyscrapers. when i return home, the mood is different. different, and worse. americans have the sense that our recovery is fragile. the greatest prosperity in a century will be enjoyed by other people in other lands, and not by our own children. tonight, i am here to tell you that this conclusion is 100% wrong. we potentially find ourselves at the threshold of our nations greatest century. we can, as reagan did, restore the great confidence of american progress and growth and optimism. tonight, as surely as you sit here, the fundamental are aligning in a way. it is there for the taking if we have the courage to grab it. and push the only problem that divide us today. consider the facts. take energy, with our new drilling technology, america will soon have an energy surplus. this is trillions of dollars in new wealth for americans. trillions of dollars. oreign-policy not overly in
you wen education, weaker in defense, by laying people off in jobs, it makes you weaker because your unemployment rate is higher. it is like looking in the mirror and wishing your weaker. we have to be stronger. can we make cuts? sure we can and we have and we'll make more. but we ought to be focused on being stronger, about growing the economy and growing jobs. and that's why the approach that the senate takes is the right approach. because by utilizing revenues appropriately, reforming tax expenditures to reduce they will on the equivalent of% o 7% or 8a year, thee myriad of tax expenditures in the tax code were able to find cuts. the senate budget in achieving additional deficit reduction is a balanced approach that will make us stronger, not weaker, and that's why it is my great hope that we will pass this in a significant way. i thank the chairman. i thank you, madam president. mrs. murray: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: i want to thank the senators virginia and hawaii for excellent statements and really laying out the framework
and opportunity. we want families that are strong, children that are well educated, we want to lift people up from poverty to put the american dream in reach for everybody. our party just can't hire our way forward. it must inspire our way forward. we will do a better job of connecting with people to our principles, showing how we can help every american climb the economic ladder. knowing parents want the best for their children, we'll champion school choice and solutions to lowering the costs of health care. instead of arithmetic, our focus should be on what helps families thrive. we don't want to fix the debt because a balanced budget looks nice, we want to do it because it will help keep money in people's pockets and create more jobs for those who have lost hope. the report minces no words in telling us that we have to be more inclusive. i agree. and as president reagan said, our 80% friend is not our 20% enemy. we can be true to our principles without being disrespectful to those who don't agree with 100% of them. finding common ground with voters will be our top priority. so, first, we're goi
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